EGO7 vs Roeckl – The Glove Review

Hello Buckers!

It has been some time since I sat down and put some words into a blog for you all! It has been a hectic few months, form riding everyday to jumping almost every weekend, I did struggle to get back into the swing of blogging. I have been quite content on sticking to my Instagram posts, and well frankly I do miss writing down my opinions and putting my thoughts down in writing. Dangerous I know, arn’t you glad I don’t do this with a few drinks on me, god knows what I would come out with!

Anyways, getting back to the point, I have a lovely glove review below! I used to hate wearing gloves, until my hands began to start hating me for being raw and sore and just being full on horrific looking because they weren’t wearing any protection (hehe lol!)

I was gifted my Roekl gloves, as a present and I purchased the Ego 7 gloves out of curiosity, I dont know what it is, but it is extremely hard to find comfortable gloves to ride in… keep scrolling to see my thoughts below!


The Roeckl Glove

About The Roeckl Glove

“Roeckl Sports, premier equestrian glove manufacturer, is a family run business based on Munich, Germany, in their 6th generation of family ownership. Roeckl has a truly unique understanding of the sensitive relationship between horse and rider. While the rider is able to feel the shape and mood the horse is in, the horse also feels the rider. The rider communicates their intention with the body and especially with the hands, which is why riding gloves must never lesson the sensitivity. Top functional materials such as Roeck-Grip were developed by Roeckl for riding. Strong yet very thin, supple and elastic, while providing an excellent grip on the reins.

Roeckl’s excellent product artisanship and superior materials are evident in their riding gloves. They understand the bond that forms between a horse and rider, and so design gloves that foster that bond with exquisite “feel.” Roeckl Gloves fit like a second skin, allowing an elegant appearance, as well as extreme sensitivity on the reins.”

My Thoughts

Name one equestrian who doesn’t rave about the Roeckl glove? Il wait. While they are on the expensive side of riding glove, the price tag is certainly worth the price when you find yourself riding in a pair of these gloves. They seem to just mould to your hand from the minute you put them on, if they are new, old or worn they just fit so snug every time.

The wide variety of styles, colours and sizes as well as gloves for different disciplines is super impressive. Roeckl have really stepped up their game big time compared to their small range that they came out with a few years ago. There is nothing really I can fault massively with this glove, the wear and tear is long standing, I have my pair over a year now and I am only seeing small stretch marks on the side on my gloves which unlike any other glove they are certainly lasting their time.

They are comfortable, the fit is well and they are not too chunky on my hands when I am riding. Its a 10/10 from me. While they are on the slightly higher scale when it comes to the price range, it is an investment worth making! Just don’t loose them and you’ll be flying!

The Ego7 Glove

About The Ego7 Action Glove

“Ego7 ACTION Glove combines top grip technology with a classic fashion look and exceptional functionality. They are made of highly abrasion-resistant, superior vegan leather that provides a second skin effect, maximum grip and suppleness. Critical seams are double-stitched for extra durability.

The branded metal logo flap fastener across the back of the hand, the elasticated wrist ensures a snug, individual fit. These gloves fit perfectly to guarantee a real feel of the reins. Thanks to the innovative touch screen fingertips, they are cell phone compatible, perfect for daily use in schooling, training, competing and pleasure riding.”

My Thoughts

The “Action” Glove as it is described on the TRI website is a stunning glove to be fair, it’s fashionable, looks good and is not bulky and stuffy like many gloves on the equestrian market at the minute. These also go up in a number sizing format, they don’t just have a small, medium or large, which I quite like. It means you can fit your glove perfectly to your hand.

Me, like the awkward hun that I always am, I panic when trying things on in shops and struggle to pay attention to many things. This resulted in me half arse trying the glove on and ending up with a pair probably a size too big for me. And in typical Darielle fashion, she only realised after taking every single tag off and after riding in them thinking her hands would grow into them. Like Honestly, who even am I.

I can sadly say that I cant use my phone when wearing this glove, I do have a feeling that this is because they are slightly too big on me, which is a shame cause I am an awful divil for a selfie when on board. In hindsight, they are fully weather resistant, super comfortable and don’t give you that horrible sweaty hand feeling after a long hard training session. They are similar pricing to the Roeckl glove with a set price of €30 per set,

My only con, they need more colours, I would love to see a brown or a navy! I would recommend investing in a pair of these gloves even though one or two of the features mentioned didn’t technically work for me, They are smart, look extremely well in show gear, and their Vegan friendly?! What more can you want!


The Verdict

Up until recently, I would of hand on heart said their is zero comparison to the Roeckl glove, I wouldn’t of even bothered looking else wear or at another brand. But I have to say Ego7 have left me weak. They have set a standard and have delivered on a fabulous product.

Don’t get me wrong, the Roeckl glove will always be a firm favourite in my eyes, but I wont be shy recommending the Ego7 pair going forward, a save of €10 is a good save these days especially if your paying for a product of the same quality!

If you wish to purchase either glove, both are available and where purchased from TRI Equestrian. See links below!

Ego7 Glove – Ego 7 Action Glove (triequestrian.ie)

Roeckl Glove – Roeckl Chester Gloves (triequestrian.ie)

Keep an eye out next for my Flex-on Vs Acavallo Stirrup review, this one has been a hot topic in my IG DM’s!

Darielle

Fear of the Fall

For such a common eventuality among horse riders, this is something I don’t see too many people talk about. This sport we do is pretty high up there in the ‘dangerous sports’ category – a quick google search of the most dangerous sports will show you that horse riding (or sports involving riding horses eg. Polo, jousting, racing etc) is always listed in the top 10. This doesn’t surprise me one bit and I’m sure it doesn’t surprise you.

In most other sports, people are putting their trust in their own abilities to complete the task they’ve given themselves. They train hard to build their strength and skills to ensure they can perform their job. Yes, we equestrians need to do the same for ourselves, but there’s an additional element that is unique to our sport. We are choosing an animal as our partner. These animals have their own minds and they’re not afraid to remind us of that. Our horses are athletes and they demand the respect of being treated as such. They require immense care along with strict training and diet plans to ensure they are given everything they need to perform the tasks we ask of them. This is the element of our sport that provides the danger.

Some may compare a horse to a race car and yes, in the sense that a vehicle can have an unknown broken part which can malfunction at the worst possible time, there is an element of risk. However, at the end of the day, a vehicle does not have feelings. A vehicle cannot be in a bad mood. A vehicle cannot feel that its back is sore. A vehicle cannot feel the nerves of its driver just before a race starts. Horses feel all of this and more and just like us humans, they have the freedom and right to react to all of this as they see fit. This is where, in my opinion, our sport has no equal comparison. To make matters even more dangerous, we put ourselves in the position where we’re actually sitting on this animal’s back, 5 feet off the ground.

I hope that by this point all you equestrians reading this are nodding your heads in agreement. I mean, when you look at all of this together you have to wonder what went wrong in our lives that we seem to have a death wish?! I’m not going to keep going on about the dangers of our sport, we all know that this hobby is a risk sport and we have consciously made the decision to partake in it. What I want to talk about is the fact that despite knowing all of this, we have decided to do this sport knowing there is a high chance we could die or, at the very least, end up in a wheelchair and yet, we continue despite having the fear of the fall. To be more specific, the fear of THAT fall.

We know that falling off is an inevitable element of our sport and a lot would argue that falling makes you a better rider and this is something I wholeheartedly agree with. The only way to learn is by making mistakes and unfortunately falling off tends to be the result of making mistakes while horse riding. The aim is to ensure you get back up and keeping going – something that is not always possible depending on how bad the fall was. But we know we at least have to try because we love what we do. Unfortunately the getting back up part is not always easy. Sometimes you physically cant because you’ve sustained an injury, other times it’s the straw that broke the camel’s back and we just can’t do it anymore.

Anyone who’s been following NBW over the last year or two will know that I’ve had my fair share of falls. From April 2018 to June 2019, I had fallen off Coco 6 times. Not all the falls were bad, for the first few I was able to get back up and keep going to an extent, but fall number 3 was particularly bad – enough for me to drag myself to A&E on Christmas Eve. This one really shattered my confidence and it took some work to build myself back up and to get back out jumping. Unfortunately after regaining my confidence, the falls just kept coming until my last one in June 2019 which resulted in a broken foot, and me being out of the saddle for an entire summer. By then I had reached a point where I realised I was no longer enjoying riding so I made the difficult decision to sell Coco.

Enter Cosmo.

Even though he was young, Cosmo was to be my brave companion. The first time I rode him ended up being the first time I jumped since the fall that broke my foot (which happened while jumping). I didn’t think that first time leaving the ground was going to be on a very green 4yo, but low and behold this gem of a horse took me confidently over a red roadblock and I made the decision that he was going to be my next horse. He’s been exactly what I wanted from a horse – brave, trusting and incredibly talented. However, being a 4yo (now 5yo) he of course still needs the correct training to ensure he becomes the horse I know he can be.

After my litany of falls the previous year, I was of course very aware that a fall from Cosmo was inevitable. I briefly mentioned before about the cause of a fall. A lot of the time, just knowing what caused the fall can be enough to get you back going again. If you know you did something that impacted your horse to make them stop at the fence then you know what you have to work on. Unfortunately not all falls have this explanation. Sometimes it’s just bad luck. Sometimes neither of you did anything wrong. And this is what happened to me and Cosmo a few months ago.

We were doing some jumping at home over some small cross poles and Cosmo went for an off stride and ended up tripping over the fence. He tried his hardest but he just couldn’t get his footing and we both ended up going down. I flipped over his head, landing quite hard on my shoulder and I needed to keep rolling to ensure I got out from underneath him. We were both pretty shaken but thankfully we both walked away with no serious injuries. While I was well enough to get back in the saddle a week later, it took quite a good 3 months before I could jump again (partly due to the pandemic to be fair).

This fall was the one that I had feared the most. I’ve seen so many other horse and rider combinations take similar falls and they are always horrifying to watch. I’ve heard so many awful stories that I always dreaded it ever happening to me. And then it did. And despite the fact that we managed to escape physically unscathed, it was just as terrifying as I imagined. The ‘what if’ of the situation is ingrained in me and the possibility that it could happen again sends a cold shiver down my spine.

Our horses are our escape, the silencers of our minds for the few hours we spend with them.

This fall really got into my head. It was only when I really thought about all of this that I realised what an impact my recent falls have had on me mentally. Most of us do this sport as our hobby and our way of decompressing. Our horses are our escape, the silencers of our minds for the few hours we spend with them. But when fear and anxiety set in and you find yourself no longer enjoying your time in the saddle, or constantly worrying that you’re not doing what you ‘should’ be doing, it can really take its toll on your mental health. Something that I grew to accept was that I may get to a point where I decide that jumping just isn’t for me anymore. And if I do reach that point, that’s ok. As I know if I do make that choice, I’ll be happier in myself.

I also know that I definitely haven’t gotten there yet. I have had a few lessons over the last few months which have shown me that I still love jumping and Cosmo is far too talented to not be jumping. I still have a lot of fight in me to push through these confidence issues. I’ve done it before and I can do it again and I’m too excited to see where me and Cosmo could go to give up just yet. But knowing that I can decide to take the pressure off myself and just enjoy my horse brings a sense of relief but also a sense of determination, when I realised that I’m not quite ready for that.

For anyone else who may be struggling with similar fears, doubts, anxiety; just know that you can decide to do whatever you feel is right for you. If that means giving up jumping for a while then so be it. If it means stopping riding altogether and just spending some quality time lounging in the field with your horse, then that’s ok too. Just do what you know is the best thing for you and you really can’t go wrong.

Thanks for reading,

ORLA

No Bucking Way Tries: POLO

I think I have found my calling in life. Last summer I put on my brave pants, bit the bullet and gave Polo lessons a go.

A few friends of mine worked in The Polo club and ever since they began to bring me along to Polo matches in Wicklow, I gained a rather soft spot for the sport… who cannot fall in love with a polo pony?!

Keep scrolling to find out all about my Polo journey…


About Polo

A quick explanation about a game of Polo – the game consists of six periods called chukkers. They last seven and a half minutes with each including a halftime period also.

Each team has four players who in turn can bring/swap between 6-8 horses per game. Players usually change horses either in between chukkers or halfway between chukkers depending on how tired the horses get.

Now Let’s get into more detail from the ins & outs of my lesson. Polo is quite technical but once shown its quite hard not to forget.

My instructor on the day was Leo, he is an Argentinian Polo Rider, what an absolute talent. Playing off a handicap of 2, (I know right a handicap? Could this be golf on horseback?) Leo has experience playing all over the world.

The most important thing he shared with me was that you don’t need any riding experience to start Polo, great for any newcomers out there reading this, or anyone who has always wanted to give it a go! With me having the experience, being able to ride a horse that is, it made a huge difference to our lesson, it made things easier for Leo it meant he could teach me how to play polo & not focus on the basics of riding a horse.

IMG_1691

Holding The Reins Correctly

In polo, they ride using the western way of riding. You always hold your reins with your left hand, and the polo Mallet in your right hand.

How to Hold the Reins Correctly:

  • You Hold your left palm out flat
  • Place both reins on top and close your hand around them
  • Use your index finger between both reins to shorten & lengthen your reins for control

It takes some getting used to, but after a while it becomes second nature.

In The Saddle Polo Tips

I could not get over how reactive the horse was at first. Steering was done through the reins, & not through a contact with the horses mouth. Using the reins, leaning them up against the horses neck to steer in the direction you want to go.

The horses were so reactive to the movement of my body, I did spent a good 10 minutes playing around with this novelty!

To stop, you simply lift both reins up and sit back in the saddle. The horses reactions were almost immediate, it was very refreshing. Do prepare yourself though I bolted forward a few times – when you want them to stop they literally stop!

GRIP WITH YOUR KNEES! Something Leo constantly had to keep reminding me to do. The idea of this was to hold yourself in place to give you the freedom to move your body around in order to tackle players during a game. Your lower leg should also hang free & loose giving it the freedom to swing back, all while keeping your toes pointed inwards!

Snapshot_81

Holding & Using The Mallet

Getting used to riding a Polo horse came fairly naturally. As I got the picked up the basic, we moved fairly quick into the proper technique on how to hold the Polo mallet (the large Stick!) and the correct way to hit the ball.

Holding The Mallet Correctly:

  1. You always hold the mallet in your right hand
  2. Hold your right hand out straight, loop the handle over your thumb
  3. Flipping your hand over, twisting the handle slightly for grip, you finish by placing the polo stick (with the number facing outward) into the palm of your hand.
  4. The end of the polo stick should lie on the end of your palm just before your wrist starts.
  5. Once you have a good grip you must then hold the stick with the end facing upwards and with your elbow tight in by your right side. See pics below!

It is a lot to take in, trust me. It took me a while to grasp it, Prepare for jelly arms!!

Snapshot_64

Let The Games Begin

There are 4 types of swings that Leo showed me. The forehand, backhand, neck, and tail. We focused on the forehand swing, one of the most common and easiest out of the 4.

In walk we began practicing by hitting the ball. It is quite petrifying to begin with, there is a fear of trying not to land on your face anytime you go to hit the ball. It wasn’t too long before I began to realised that keeping your eye on the ball and not in the horses legs gives you a better chance of actually being able to hit the ball.

One thing Leo did comment on was not to hit the ball as if I was holding a tennis racket, that was down to more practice being needed by me to get used to proper polo techniques.

As I got the grips with things, we began to hit the ball in canter. Dear Lord it was a million times harder. I did manage to hit the ball a few times, but there were also times where I nearly whacked the poor horse straight in the face…. I honestly don’t know how horses had the patience for me!

Tackling

You almost forget that during a polo match you are playing against an opposite team trying to win the ball for points. The tackling part of the sport is something that will take a little longer for me to get used to.

When Leo went in for a tackle the first time pushing me & my horse away from the ball using his upper body, I literally stopped the horse dead and let out a scream. As we practiced more, my competitive streak began to show & I improved quite rapidly….. apparently you’re not allowed use your elbows… its a foul if you do!

We finished up shortly after this, I was just about able to breath, the fitness behind a polo player is phenomenal. I definitely have a new found appreciation for the sport that’s for sure.

The Verdict

What an amazing experience, one that I will most definitely never forget & one I always look back on with a fire in my stomach to get back on board & learn more. I do hope to start back up again this summer. You never know, you might see me playing my first official polo match in The Phoenix park yet!

A big thank you to Palo Alto & The All Ireland Polo Club who I organised this lesson with last year. Have anyone of you tried playing Polo? Let me know in the comments below. I do apologise if my Polo Terminology is not spot on, I’m am after all a beginner!

Snapshot_78

Want to see how my lesson really went? Check out the video below!

Thanks for Reading,

Darielle

Exercise 1 – Flat To The Mat

It has been some time since an exercise has been done here at No Bucking Way. I certainly feel a little rusty especially when it came to planning & thinking out some exciting exercises to set up & try out for you guys.

Don’t you worry though, I have decided to start the year with a lovely flatwork exercise. I struggle sometimes to stay concentrated whilst riding, especially during these dark evenings. I spend most of my time thinking about when I am going to be finished rather than the work I want to focus on with Dante in the arena.

Look no further, I have compiled this lovely exercise for you to try out. Of course as always it comes in sections, so keep scrolling to find out everything you need to know!

The Set Up

For this exercise, you will need 6 poles. See the image below as to how they should be laid out in your arena. If you can, try to keep one side of your arena free so that you have that extra bit of space when it comes to doing certain parts of the exercise.

The distance between the canter poles should be walked out with 10 footsteps between them. This worked well for Dante, but it can also be adjusted to suit your horse or pony by adding in or taking away a footstep.

The Benefits

Sharpens up your transitions

Improves your eye for a stride

Improves your horses balance & suppleness

Improves Flexability

How To Ride This Exercise?

Step 1: As always, we advise that a good warm up is done prior to partaking in any of our exercises. For this exercise I focused a lot on transition work with Dante before we began, also making sure he was moving forward from my leg. As you progress into this exercise you will see that it is all about Transitions in certain parts.

Leg Yielding. Focus on getting 2-3 steps from your horse

Step 2: The Leg Yield. Yes, I said it! I decided to challenge myself as well as you all with this one. I spend the guts of 15 minutes practicing this in walk around the arena on both reins. This really helped to supple & relax Dante before we got into serious business.

If you dont know the aids for leg yielding, see the link below! Dont forget if your horse struggles but manages to get one or two steps always remember to reward your horse! Small wins will give you big wins in the long run.

Steps For riding the perfect Leg Yield

Step 3: Once you have mastered your leg yield, it is then time to start putting some focus on your canter poles. You want your approach to be calm, collected & relaxed. And once you reach pole one you want a smooth canter all the way through until you land after pole 4. Try this a couple of times. Once your happy with how your horse is moving we can then begin to piece everything together.

Piecing your Leg yield & Canter together

Step 4: Lets get Down to business. Now that we have established some key components to our exercise from step 2 & 3, It is finally time to piece everything together. See the image to the left. In this you are putting together your leg yield, your canter & some pole work also.

Remember to sit calm, & really focus on using your legs for your transitions. Begin by leg yielding across the long side of your arena, once you hit the track remember to ride your horse straight & keep them moving forward. Once you reach your corner, in the image where it is marked with the red x, this is your spot for asking your horse up into canter. Continue to canter around your corner and over your single canter pole. This is a 10-15m circle. So sitting up tall as you ride this circle is important, not only to balance yourself, but to keep your horse balanced also.

Step 5: Once you are happy with the above, you are now ready to graduate on to the final & full “Flat to the Mat” exercise. This will incorporate everything, leg yielding, canter poles & your upward transitions. See below an image as to how you should ride it! Remember to sit quiet & remain quiet with your hands over your canter poles. One of my worst habits!

Once you are happy with how your horse is riding this exercise, remember to always leave your horse on a good note.

I found this exercise super productive & really made me focus during my riding sessions. Sometimes when you have a plan in place & pre plan your riding sessions, results really start to show.

Give it a go, & be sure to tag me in any videos you take of you doing this exercise. I unfortunately didn’t get any footage of this one, but I will be sure to take some in future. As for the name of this exercise, dont ask, Thinking of inventive exercise names is a serious down fall of mine!

Keep your eyes peeled, I have a lovely challenging jumping exercise coming up next, not to mention there are loads of poles involved. My favourite!

Until Next Time,

Darielle

A Survival Guide To Winter Riding – 7 Top Tips

If I had a euro for every time I heard an Equestrian say those dreaded lines, “the evenings are getting darker” or “Im not riding its raining” I would have myself a nice sum of money thats for sure!  Not many of us are fond of the winter weather, but unlike other hobbies us Equestrian put the head down and carry on with things no matter the consequence.

If Dante could mix his own feeds & exercise himself I’d let him at it…. But what if I told you there were a few tricks for some winter riding balance? Like getting the important things done but on a shorter schedule than normal..  

I have put together a list of 7 winter riding survival tips not only to shorten your time out in the cold but to also get some benefits to that dreaded winter riding….   

1. Lunging

When it comes to shortening up your evening in the yard one word comes to mind… LUNGING.

As much as we make ourselves think we want to ride 5 days a week in the Baltic weather conditions, who are we actually kidding? At least once a week I roll up to the yard forcing myself to brave the cold with Dante to only find myself hopping back in the car to go home!

Well this is your easy way out. If it’s just to stretch your horses legs or getting the freshness out of them after a few days off, lunging is simply perfect to implement into your winter riding routines. What better way to see progress than looking at your horse moving from the ground!

2. Variety

Most of us work 4-5 days a week. If you work any less than that and can still afford a horse please do look into giving me a job!! Daylight hours are so precious racing down to the yard on your day off to ride in normal light is a very rare occasion!

Recently I have tried to incorporate a weekly outing for Dante instead of running around the same arena we work in everyday. Why not try make it routine that you go out jumping in a winter league, or why not treat your horse to a walk on the beach?

Get yourself and your horse out of that yard (if you can!) it will only do you and your horse all the better, think of it as prep for all those spring summer shows, your horse will get used to travelling they will begin to enjoy the weekly treat of visiting somewhere new.

Make sure to also make use of every single indoor arena rental there is available to you!! God bless anyone with an indoor arena in this weather, spot the jealous Hun Over here…

3. Re-Evaluate your Training Schedule

There comes a time during the Winter, normally hits mid November when you start to think to yourself, why am I breaking my back trying to keep up with such a hardcore training session for my horse? Take a step back and think to yourself, are you competing regularly? Do U need to be training this hard?

I have decided to take a step back and cut my riding days down to 4 instead of 5. In doing this, I found that I put much more energy into getting good sessions over the 4 days rather than struggle to motivate myself over 5!

Don’t be hard on yourself, some weeks when I only ride twice & lunge twice, some weeks when I ride even less. But during each session I pick on one thing to focus on whether it be transitions on the lunge or having a consistent forward rhythmic canter on both reins whilst riding. These small things will make massive differences when you go to pick up a full routine in the Spring.

4. Make Use of What You Have

By this I don’t mean that you are limited to supplies whether it be wings poles or fillers etc. Who else hates pulling and dragging poles in the cold? GUILTY!

Just the other day I went to ride in the arena, when I arrived there was one pole. One pole laid out and yes I will admit I was way too lazy to get down, set something up and so on. The point in this is that I am pushing you to make do with what you have. Let your imagination run wild. Have fun in your training schedule, push the boundaries! Make winter a time to investigate the hidden talents your horse has!

Here’s a simple pole laid out in the arena, see below the many different exercises I done with it. See what I mean? Open your mind & start getting creative.

5. Give Your Horse A Break

Hands up who loves a winter city break? Well guess what…. if you deserve one, so does your horse. Give your horse a week off, a few days off here and there wont hurt either. Winter should be a time for them to recuperate, refresh & to evaluate what they have done and learned over the summer.

You would be surprised what a few days off can do to clear the head. You will have an eager, willing horse when they comes back into work.

This was taken back in September when rug weren’t needed!

6. Cooling Down your Horse Correctly

Its all fun and games riding that amazing training session, having your horse moving forward & working Fabulously only to realise that when you finish you don’t have the time to wait around for your horse too cool off correctly before rugging. Winter time also comes with the dreaded cooling off time…. never forget to schedule time for “THE SWEAT”!!!

Walking your horse around the arena after you ride helps cool them down quicker, a walker can also do this for you as you run around tidying up your bits! Be sure to put a cooler on your horse while there walking to avoid them getting a chill. When stabling be sure to remove the damp cooler and replace it with your heavy rug or stable rug when your putting your horse away for the night.

7. Dress Accordingly

Don’t be the hero. Or should I say don’t be that idiot roaming around in the next to nothing T-shirt in the -2 degrees frost bitten weather. I will not pity the cold or flu you get because going around not appropriately dressed to the weather is your own fault!!

Wearing my Zerofit Ultimate Base Layer

Grab your thermals, grab your base layers, winter is not pretty!! It’s hello rosy cheeks & numb fingers goooodbye bronzed skin & bingo wings… Wrap up well & look after yourself. Your limited enough when it comes to time in the saddle don’t let getting sick get in the way too! I always have a spare pair of gloves & socks at the yard incase I ever need them, be sure to do the same yourself, its a blessing in disguise!


And there you have it my 7 winter riding survival tips. Have I left out any important go to ones? Be sure to let me know.

We are based in Ireland, the temperate is currently 4degrees, with a non stop mixture rain or winds that are so cold they would cut you in half!

Do let us know your Winter tips in the comments below, I would love to hear about the fun secretive winter tricks you swear by in the winter aswell, the more the merrier!

As always, thanks you for reading & watch yourself in this weather, don’t be out there catching colds, Wrap up warm!!

Darielle

Top 5 Horse Riding Sayings Explained!

It goes without saying, that some of the slang us horsey people use are next to ridiculous! There often comes a time when you hear yourself saying certain things to not only receive certain looks from your regular human, but quite often you do get big outbursts of laughter! 

I have pulled together some of my most frequently used sayings, some that anyone who is not fond of the equestrian world & their terms may find it difficult to begin to process how these sayings can even relate to a young woman or man and their horse! 

So, without any further hesitation, if you have a husband, a partner or older kids and you are often caught in the firing line of explaining certain sayings, look no further! 

I have picked my top 5 that I feel are in desperate need of an explanation! Keep scrolling to find out the real meaning behind these! And dont jump to any conclusions at a first glance!! 


I can’t Wait for The ride Later”

Us equestrians really do love our sport. If we could we would be with our animals every second of the day. But unfortunately work & life sometimes get in the way! The above saying often turns the head of those not horsey males especially when said out loud in an office! People, we are talking about exercising our HORSES!!! 

I have to wash his willy”

If horses were able to do this task, trust me we would happily let them & step away from this not so pleasant scenario. Keeping your horses bits clean & infection free is a must when you own a male horse (gelding). Unlucky for us equestrians, we have to get elbow deep literally with the cleaning of his “bits”. If you want more detail on this, do check out this blog post I wrote on the subject. For any non horsey people, it is quite the eye opener!

Your going in too deep”

Jumping your horse can be so majestic, but there are times when you just don’t get it right & it turns into quite a disaster. Walking into an equestrian centre & hearing a female instructor in particular screaming “your going in to deep” can be a head turner.

Any regular person may take a moment to think about what they had just heard, but trust me there is an explanation. See this image to the left, it simply means that your horse has not left enough space in front of the jump in order to clear the fence comfortably, in turn they have gone in too deep! 

He won’t come into my hands”

Having a contact with your horse whilst riding is a vital part of well, riding your horse! You do often see horses running around the place, heads in the air tongues hanging out of their mouths with very frustrated riders on their backs. I am one of those riders. Having your horse come into your hands can be difficult, and no it has nothing to do with washing your horses willy!! When we say this we are basically asking our horse to work from our legs up the contact! Practice makes perfect with this one. 

I Just rode him bareback down the lane”

Our horses wear a saddle when we ride them, or so any normal people think. But often us equestrian want to venture into the world of riding our horse without a saddle, and just sitting on their bare – back. This is where this saying comes in to play, for any of you filthy minded animals!!! Their can be massive benefits from riding your horse bareback, from correcting your position on the saddle, to strengthening your legs! It is something I love to do, I am often seen riding Dante bareback down my yard lane!! 


Anyone with a filthy mind is probably sitting back in disbelief that the above slander is quite PG when it comes to properly explaining it, and to anyone with kids I apologise for the 50 millions questions in advance!!

On the plus side, at least now you can have some peace of mind when you hear your beloved wife, girlfriend or boyfriend using any of the above terms in conversations!

Have you heard any other hilarious puns or horse riding slander used? Be sure to write them in the comments below & if you want any horse sayings translated please do let us know!

Until Next Time, 

Darielle